Conditional Brand

Conditional Brand reaches out through virtual technology

Chris and I met for lunch and to talk about what’s new in automated digital marketing.

After the usual recap of the last month’s activities we got down to cases.

Getting Pixelled ain’t pretty.

 You know how you’ll just casually look at shoes or furniture or a new whiz-bang tech gadget while you’re answering e-mail or stuckon an interminable phone call and then for days later every time you turnaround ads for that sort of stuff keep popping up in your browser? You, myfriend have been pixeled.

The way that works is that a 1×1 pixel is placed on web page and is triggered whenever the page is visited or a positive action taken such as signing up for a newsletter or an information packet or white paper. When that action occurs, the pixel acquires the information needed to retarget you.

You have been retargeted.

Retargeting is a cookie-based technology that uses simple Javascript code to anonymously ‘follow’ your audience all over the Web. Each time you visit a site, the code drops an anonymous browser cookie. Later, when you browse the Web, the cookie lets a retargeting provider know when to serve ads, ensuring that ads are served to only those people who have visited the pixeled site.

 The Cookie is no dummy

It is stored on your browser. It tracks your movements on the website in question and remembers your behaviors and preferences. It doesn’t transfer across browsers, but most of us use a single browser 80 to 90 Percent of the time.

One common way a cookie gets placed on your browser is via Contextual Targeting. This is most common on those “news” pages in your browser. Click on what appears to be news feed and before you can swipe to the next photo you’re confronted by a display ad. Chomp! You just bit into the cookie.

One step further

The latest wrinkle in on-line marketing takes pixeling and retargeting(or remarketing if you prefer) one step further. It personalizes brand to the maximum. We decided to call it “Conditional.”

Here’s how it works:

  1. You have been pixeled and retargeted.
  2. You return to the web site and are served up the site you first visited.
  3. As you refine your search on the site or look into other products the cookie remembers.
  4. The next time you visit, the site may appear and read entirely differently depending on the information you shared on your last visit because the cookie is relaying where you are in the customer journey for this product or service
  5. Each time you visit the conditional site can change to match up with your previous behavior and stated preferences.

If/then constraints

It becomes very quickly apparent that massive amounts of copy and graphic changes might have to be employed to take this capability to maximum effect.

Few of us have sufficient knowledge of our customers journey and how to shift our web sites to handle different basic personality differences let alone for the massive number of changes going completely conditional might force.

Then, too, we need to maintain the key elements of the brand’s value proposition and positioning. How much personalization can we inject and still maintain the Trust that separates our brand from competitors?

 Conditional websites will come

It is already starting to happen. We will keep an eye on this development and let you know more as we uncover the trend.

Let us know if you run into an example.

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­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­Jerry Fletcher is a sought-after International Speaker, a beBee ambassador, founder and Grand Poobah of www.BrandBrainTrust.com His consultingpractice, founded in 1990, is known for Trust-based Brand development,Positioning and business development for independent           professionals on and off-line.

Consulting: www.JerryFletcher.com
Speaking: www.NetworkingNinja.com
DIY Training: www.ingomu.com0

Brand Edge On

A friend once described the Platte river (near Denver, Colorado) as a mile wide and an inch deep.

Your brand might be like that.

You have a choice to make:

  • Maintain your broad coverage
  • Dive deep into a select audience segment.
  • Try a little of both

The broad brush

Your target may be portrayed in broad brush strokes at the beginning. Most entrepreneurs believe that broad appeal will get them the most customers.

Maybe.

More often the broad appeal helps those who will become their best customers/clients find the company, product or service. That gives the appearance of a brand that works. But if you don’t regularly probe the information your customers/clients are willing to give you the profiles of your best purchasers will not be revealed.

Edge on

How can you tell? The rule of thumb is that the more niched you are, the better off you’ll be. Generally, that is true. To evaluate your situation, look at the depth of what you know about your client base, the percentage of your sales that cluster in one group, initial and repeat purchases as well as the estimated life time value (LTV) of the individuals as well as where you want to take the business.

The more carefully you describe your avatars, verify them with market research and, over time, add details to their portraits the better you will understand the kind of people that can make you successful. If you’re well-funded, that research can be done by a specialist firm. If you’re little guy, under-funded, or a start-up you may have to do personal interviews to get a handle on that better picture.

What works? I’ve been successful with all three of the choices. More successful with a deep dive. Most successful with the combination and carefully watching the metrics.

Deep Art

The more detailed portrayal of your ideal customer/client the greater the probability of enhanced profits. True, there may be fewer. But each will be worth more in most cases. Repeat purchases are the primary reason as well as a tendency to accept higher prices. The fact that you have found them and are personalizing your approach establishes a large emotional difference from competitors. It makes your brand unique.

Detailed knowledge of two or three groups can not only add to your profits, it can extend the life of your business. A financial planner might open the doors and quickly find that her primary customers are Baby Boomers but that they are referring their children who are in the cohort known as Boomers II or Generation Jones born between 1955 and 1965. They, too, refer other youngsters, born between 1966 and 1976 (Generation X).

The planner may find that Generation X is significantly different from the older clients. But her only way to build the business long term is to understand the differences, speak their language and make the picture familiar to them.

The cohorts are often put into “Buckets.” You could easily identify the three noted above. But the Brand oriented planner will take it a step further using automation software that allows you to “tag” each contact with a full array of ways to sort them into segments within the groups. Here are just a few:

  • Demographics (Age, sex, income, education, housing etc.)
  • Psychographics (Observable personal behavior)
  • Engagement (The degree they respond to your offers)
  • Purchase Behavior (purchases, repeat purchases frequency, recency)
  • Satisfaction (Reviews and testimonials)

Wade in

Keep track of what you learn about your customers/clients. The depth of your knowledge will impact the value of your business every single day.


­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­Jerry Fletcher ThinkinigJerry Fletcher is a sought-after International Speaker, a beBee ambassador, founder and Grand Poobah of www.BrandBrainTrust.com

His consulting practice, founded in 1990, is known for Trust-based Brand development, Positioning and business development for independent professionals on and off-line.

Consulting: www.JerryFletcher.com
Speaking: www.NetworkingNinja.com
DIY Training: www.ingomu.com